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Taking Diigo Beyond the Bookmark

diigocheckThe response to my initial Diigo post has been overwhelming. Many of you discovered the benefits of Diigo’s bookmark features so I wanted to share a few thinking-outside-of-the-box ideas for doing more with Diigo.

Books to Read List

Every reader has a list of the books they intend to read. Personally, I’ve tried web reading lists, text files, and spreadsheets but Diigo is the best way I’ve discovered to create a book list. Here’s how:

  • Search for the book you want to read on Amazon.com
  • Bookmark the page, highlight the front cover image and ISBN number
  • Tag the book as “Reading List” or “To Read”, whatever you like
  • Add tags for Fiction, Non-Fiction (optionally you could add tags that relate to the subject matter)
  • Create a list called “Booklist” and add all the books to that list.

Now all your books are categorized and you can generate a report that includes pictures of the cover and ISBN number. If you are part of a bookclub invite the others into a group to share notes and recommendations.

House Hunting

Last year we bought a home and during the process my wife and I probably emailed 100+ links to one another. Each time we found a home we liked on a Realtor’s site we’d shoot off an email. It was impossible to keep track of the ones we liked (and why). Here’s how I’d do it now:

  • Bookmark a home, highlight the photos
  • tag link with # of bedrooms/baths, price range, and location
  • capture opinions in the comments
  • add to a “Potential Homes” list

10 seconds per page and you can build a report with photos, comments, and sort the options by tags. If only I’d thought of this last year.

Writers

Every writer knows the value of good research and with Diigo the process just got easier. Here’s a couple of ideas:

  • tag items based on chapter, subject
  • tag items for a bibliography
  • jot a few notes to give context or your thoughts at the time
  • highlight the section you intend to use and save the time of reviewing the entire page

Diigo becomes even more essential in a collaboration project. The Forrester team used Delicious during their research for the book Groundswell and I bet they would have found Diigo features like highlighting, comments, and groups very useful.

Web/Graphic Designers

The internet is the ultimate showcase and the designers I follow on twitter are always sharing great examples of web design, themes, logos, and typography. Why not create an inspiration library?

  • tag by type of design – website, logo, font
  • tag by style – minimalist, color pattern, clean, modern, retro

Educators

Diigo is huge in the education community. They even offer special premium Educator Accounts with specific features.

Excerpt from Diigo Education FAQ:

Diigo’s features allow teachers to highlight critical features within text and images and write comments directly on the web pages, to collect and organize series of web pages and web sites into coherent and thematic sets, and to facilitate online conversations within the context of the materials themselves.

I can’t do justice to all that Diigo offers teachers so I’ll share the links to get started

Food Lovers

The times they are a changing. My m other has a shelf full of cookbooks, my wife has a folder full of links. I’m not discouraging the greatness of a cookbook but many of us food lovers have found our greatest recipes online. Add a 2 cups of Diigo and we get our own web based cookbook.

  • tag recipes as appetizers, entrees, or desserts
  • tag as vegetarian, diet, gluten free, or my favorite “enough-calories-to-make-Paula-Deen-blushoreo
    • disclosure: the above link leads to my wife food blog MakeLifeDelicious.com, it’s the greatest food blog on earth #unbiased
  • tag by ingredients
  • highlight cooking times and pics

Information Technology

I can leave out my fellow I.T. professionals. Most good admins and engineers have a set of bookmarks that is their tech library. Here’s how to improve it:

  • tag as tutorial, demo, or how-to
  • tag by tech vendor Microsoft, Symantec, Cisco, etc…
  • tag by type – knowledge base article, forum post, blog post, white paper
  • highlight the important part so you don’t have to read the entire page

Takeaways

Regardless of your profession we live in a information age and you are only as good as the information you have.

  • Highlighting, tagging, and lists are an easy and effective way to organize anything online
  • You library is worthless without lists, reports, and searching

How do you use Diigo?

Link on.

{ 18 comments… add one }

  • bonnerj January 5, 2010, 12:12 pm

    Thanks for these tips! I just created a Diigo account based on your earlier post.

  • Keith January 5, 2010, 12:36 pm

    Glad to hear it. I hope you find it as useful as I have. Thank you very much
    for reading.

  • John January 6, 2010, 12:19 am

    You have some good points here. It seems like everyday new things are coming out that help make our lives easier.

  • michaelcjohnson January 6, 2010, 3:22 pm

    Some interesting thoughts… I hadn't thought of using diigo as a “books to read” list. If you know additional links for uses of diigo in education I am looking for more.

  • johnpaint January 6, 2010, 4:17 pm

    I think this book marking thing is the next big thing.

  • Suzy Brooks January 6, 2010, 8:08 pm

    Love the idea of using Diigo as a Book Wish List or Book-As-Resource list. We use Diigo in our district to collect resources for teachers to access for their students.

  • ryan January 7, 2010, 6:22 pm

    Do you have any tips for highlighting the cover on amazon? It seems to be impossible to select.

  • Keith January 7, 2010, 10:34 pm

    I use Firefox with the toolbar installed. When I right click the image it
    gives an option to Highlight and Bookmark. Let me know how that works for
    you.

  • ryan January 7, 2010, 10:36 pm

    Oh nice, didn't know about the right-click option. Thanks.

  • leslieperry January 14, 2010, 9:41 am

    I love Diigo too. My son (10 years old) is working on his IB Exhibition on Water Pollution. He is working as part of a team. I helped them create a group for their topic so that they and their teacher can add resources, highlight text and tag interesting facts about the subject from home. Also, I am in a master's in education media design and am using Diigo to organize my resources for my Action Research project. Diigo is a great tool. Thanks for posting.

  • Darren Jones January 25, 2010, 11:47 am

    As a University Careers Service, we've transferred all our links to Diigo, and created lists for different career areas for students to access. I want to do more things with highlighting and post its at some point. A real revelation for us, however, has been to use Diigo for internal staff communication. I've set up a News group for people to share any useful careers-related articles they come across. We also have various Jobs/Scholarships groups to share relevant graduate vacancies we find. The RSS feeds from these then post to Twitter and our own Jobs and Further Study pages. Saves a lot of time entering the details into our own database and gets the information to our students and graduates quicker. Hopefully! It also keeps staff abreast with up-to-date jobs information. Diigo is great!

  • thecraftylibrarian February 16, 2010, 5:57 pm

    I opened a Diigo account last month, but have yet to play around with it mainly due to restrictions my work has that prevents me from importing delicious bookmarks, etc. I fully intend to go home and have a proper “go of it”. These ideas are really great, and I can see how they could prove applicable in future! Thanks (^_^)

  • Keith February 16, 2010, 10:27 pm

    I'm glad you liked the ideas. Thanks for taking the time to read and for
    leaving me a comment.

  • Diabolic Preacher May 7, 2010, 5:04 pm

    I really really appreciate the trouble you took to give detailed tags example. Regardless of taking diigo's extra features, your tag examples show very concretely that same set of links can be dynamically viewed under different contexts and they do make sense individually or as clubbed. I've been using delicious since some years, then simpy, then some days back noticed I'd a diigo login stored in my password manager and had forgotten what diigo was!! you are a very patient writer. thanks to diigo? :D

  • Diabolic Preacher May 7, 2010, 10:04 pm

    I really really appreciate the trouble you took to give detailed tags example. Regardless of taking diigo's extra features, your tag examples show very concretely that same set of links can be dynamically viewed under different contexts and they do make sense individually or as clubbed. I've been using delicious since some years, then simpy, then some days back noticed I'd a diigo login stored in my password manager and had forgotten what diigo was!! you are a very patient writer. thanks to diigo? :D

  • tag link September 28, 2010, 1:30 pm

    You wrote very interesting post i love your blog it contains very informative article i will share it with my friends.

  • Al Tucker May 5, 2011, 9:04 am

    The lists function has gotten my links organized into a very workable space. I have set up curriculum related lists that make it easy for me and my students to share and find related links on any part of my curriculum. It goes far beyond simple bookmarking.

  • Keith May 5, 2011, 9:27 pm

    I’m possibly a list addict but I love my bookmark lists. (Nice they export as well). Have you tried any Diigo groups for your students?

    Thanks for sharing the idea.

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